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of the past four years in the obama administration is how much policy has been driven from the white house. some presidents at least give lip service to cabinet government and empowering their secretaries. obama seems to have gone pretty far the other way. so i'm curious, one, in a second obama term was a continuation of the pattern, and with romney how do you think he would run things in terms of the relationship between the department and the white house? governor. >> i think we've strayed some distance from constitutional government in the sense the white house staff has been built up with layers of folks who kind of cushion the president from the departments and agencies. so i compare and contrast just by being a low-level staffer under reagan on the advanced staff, and seen that the universe of high profile cabinet members who interacted at least from what i can see, more directly with the president. and now we have layers that kind of cushion the president, a deputy chief of staff for policy or whatever the case might be. and i think we're drifting farther and farther away from that
.s. catholic of bishops to the obama administration rules and the affordable health care act for contraceptive coverage in such cases. parenthetically, and this is the relevant in the room, both catholics disagree with the school teaching on contraception. >> i am one of those catholics. [laughter] in this case the institution i believe still has religious freedom, but other parties are involved and they have their freedoms, too, their religious freedom, in addition these catholic institutions receive government funding for their operations. so, you have here attention of these different conflicting rights going on here. the rules proposed by the obama administration first say that the church institutions had to provide contraceptive health care insurance for their and please. not only the u.s. catholic bishops, but many other catholics and many other proponents and religious liberty oppose the obama administration and regulation they then propose a compromise that such employees would be covered for contraception but the institution wouldn't have to pay for it. they call that a brilliant solu
administration stories shifted in all of that and maybe if you don't already like obama, maybe that will help inform your choice of whether to vote for him, but not it seems lately because it's given you the information or the tools to think about what ought to happen in libya or what our policy and let the ought to be to really come to praise and foreign policy coverage as character coverage. i think those categories in a way get confused. you have separated them out, but it's -- or we learned about the world when we read that article or are we learning about whether mitt romney cares about the little guy or about whether obama is brave? i think it is a tricky question because you might indeed get the information that you feel you need to know to vote for this person or that person. but there's also the other little issue about learning about the articles are about more about the actual problems in the world beyond the election might be coming and i don't think that the character thing is negligible. it is important if somebody cares about the little guy. that is crucial about how they see t
. >> there's a question here about something president obama did, which is a stopgap policy, which was essentially to say, my administration is not going to enforce deportation of laws as they pertain to younger immigrants who were born here, a legal immigrant parents commit them to school, have you got in trouble. were not going to deport them. is that a good idea? >> it's absolutely a great idea. politically he was brilliant. romney said of changing his policy are now bidding him. it's a policy that matters. >> the obama administration has supported more undocumented and probably the last five administrations put together. and you would not expect that from a democratic administration. i'm not quite sure why they've been so forceful, but they have been. the people that rupert is talking about is they would carry to age three months in this country and their parents arms. did they break the law? i don't know how it's written, but technically they had no right to come across the border. they did, but in terms of culpability, i mean, come on. these are people were self-selected grou
on the relationship between the obama administration and the u.s. supreme court. the author examines the recent addition of four justices in the past fife years -- five years and how it has affected the court's decisions on numerous cases including its recent ruling on health care. it's about an hour. [applause] >> thank you, mark. hello, everybody. so excited to be here in philadelphia. you know, i know that's just the usual pandering that goes on by speakers, but in my case it happens to be true. i am not myself from philadelphia, but my dad, jerry toobin, was overbrook high school -- [applause] oh, yeah. the panlderring has just begun, don't worry. [laughter] curtis institute, i don't know if we have any violinists here. and he went to temple as well. [applause] so, you know, and e taught me that -- he taught me that the streets were paved with tasty cake here, and i have enjoyed my visits ever since. [laughter] i would, um, i'm really happy to be talking about the oath today, it only came out two days ago. so far so good. [laughter] and, um, it's, um, it's, you know, it's exciting to -- you
than the senate or the obama administration making its proceedings more transparent to the public online. that is according to participants of a semi-foundation for an in washington d.c. the group also discussed the fact that lawmakers not only read the legislation of full before voting on it. this is 90 minutes. >> welcome. my name is daniel schuman, director of the advising committee and transparency. today's discussion is going to focus on whether congress is serious about transparency. we are going to beat the one 112 congress and also identify some of the deficits. we are going to do my speaking portion very quickly because it's really interesting is of course a panelist on to say. to mr. for introducing them. on my right is hugh halpern, staff director for the u.s. house of representatives committee and rules. on the committee is served us chief advisor. immediately to my left is jim harper, director of policy studies at the cato institute and also the founder of washington watch.com, which keeps a close eye on legislation and federal funding. jenna sasser to mention washing
] [inaudible conversations] >> now with a look at military operations, ashton carter talked-about the obama administration and strategic shift to the asia-pacific region during his remarks at the wilson center. >> great introduction. more about challis at the moment. thanks to npr and the woodrow wilson center. i just left jane harman for those in the pentagon and she is everything right now secretary panetta, a member of the defense policy board on iran. actually. she wasn't able to be here but she is a wonderful leader at the institution. recognize her as well. mr. ambassador, all members of the diplomatic community are here, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen, really wonderful to be here to celebrate the launch of this year's addition of strategic asia. our mission to strengthen the asia pacific policy through research is one that is close to my heart. i share npr's conviction that facts and ideas matter in the public realm. and b are's research helps us understand the world and make decisions within it. for the publications you produce, meetings you convene, scoop jackson would
obamacare trying to investigate the obama administration. and this is exactly what would be predicted. so what we have is separation of parties, not really separation of powers. because when you have unified government, you don't have oversight. and what we need to address is how do we get the benefit of oversight that you do get when you have divided government without paying the immense cost which is the near impossibility -- at least in our time now -- of passing response bive legislation. responsive legislation. >> i just have a question about kind of, like, the amendment process. so, like, our constitution's had hardly kind of any amendments, and some of them are kind of big like the fact i can vote. [laughter] and i just, like, the fact that i can vote, the fact that black people are no longer considered property, those are huge changes to, like, the philosophy of the constitution. and i don't know if they actually, like, even succeed to see how it's even the 14th amendment thing i thought didn't really change things for a long time. do you think that in a new constitution that an a
opinion for a somewhat stronger american stance vis-a-vis the syrian conflict than the obama administration has thus far adopted. governor romney's speech today is almost certain to raise this point, whether it will raise it in a way that captures the public imagination and strikes them as sensible remains to be seen, but i would say that this survey and governor rom ty's speech -- romney's speech plus developments on the ground may be the entering wedge for what i personally regard as an overdue public debate about what the united states ought to be doing vis-a-vis the syrian conflict. >> bill, thank you so much. um, let me now turn to hisham, and bill talked about the apparent polarization of u.s. public opinion on foreign policy issues. perhaps not surprising four weeks out from a campaign in which foreign policy has suddenly and surprisingly begun to play a significant role in both the campaigns. but what we see in the arab world is with the emergence of more democratic politics, polarization as well. around a number of issues that relate to the relationship, the interact
. as yet what are the noteworthy aspects of the last four years in the obama administration how much policy has been driven from the white house? some presidents give lip service to the cabinet government and in power and their secretaries. obama seems to have gone pretty far the other way. so i'm curious to get a second obama term what we see the continuation of the pattern in which romney, how do you think that he would write things in terms of the relationship in the department and the white house? >> i think we have strayed some distance from the government in the sense that the white house staff has been built up with the lawyers of folks that had to cushion the president from the departments and agencies. sallai compare and contrast just be kind of low-level staffer under ronald reagan on the advanced staff and seeing the universe of high-profile kavanagh members who interjected at least from what i could see more directly with the president and now we have lawyers that kind of cushion the president and the deputy chief of staff of policy or whatever the case might be. and i think tha
about the specifics. you even have a case where the congress and the obama administration slowed the growth of medicare spending by $700 billion, and they're being attacked by republicans for having done that. so, in an environment where you can't talk about medicare, in an environment where no one will talk about base broadeners, everyone talks about loophole closers, how do you, how do you get from here to there? and let me ask doug, first, you said that the environment will be different in 2013. other than this pressure you talked about pro the rating agencies what will get these guys singing kumbayah with each other? >> they're not going to sing kumbayah. i don't want to pretend that they will. this environment is the worst but this would be the right time to fix the fiscal cliff so we don't have to worry about the economics. not happening. lame duck would be the second worst. and for all the reasons i outlined i think it is very unlikely we'll do anything real significant. do the little bit you can to avoid damage and get to next year where, i think they're going to be outsi
potential implication is that it could prompt for example moscow or in the future even romney or obama or beyond that administration to be able to rethink the commitments without the rest of the world. with that, turn it over to you. >> thank you, travis. i'm here to talk about information warfare. information warfare is important because it crosscuts all the different campaigns that we've been talking about. the land, air and sea in the missile campaign. the chinese it's also important because they view information and the ability to use information and the ability to deny information as the primary or the foundational criteria for whether you win or lose on the battlefield. but before i get to much into the information more for let me talk about the pla concept operations to inform the warfare. the chinese are looking to fight a war that has been called a quick war what resolution. they have looked at let's say the falkland islands and the 1991 operation desert storm and they have come to determine that battles are fought with just one campaign. it's not like world war ii were the of
brought more trade cases against china in one term than the previous administration did in two, and, by the way, we have been winning the cases. >> wednesday, president obama and mitt myth meet in the first presidential debate. the newshour jim leher moderates. live with our live preview at 7 p.m. eastern. on c-span, both candidates on screen, the entire debate. on c-span2, the multicamera version of the debate and dpolling, your reactions, calls, e-mailing and tweets. follow our coverage on c-span, c-span radio, and online at c-span doirgs. >> i have all the channels, house, senate, plus author, book review, speeches, those kinds of things. if i know a bill's coming up on the floor in the house, i watch, you know, which channel i want to see because i have them all. if there's either a speech i know that you've covered or a book review or so on, i'm going to watch that. when i want to find out something that has some value
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13